Wabar iron (oxidized) meteorite 22.4 grams for sale!
Wabar iron (oxidized) meteorite 22.4 grams for sale!
Wabar iron (oxidized) meteorite 22.4 grams for sale!
Wabar iron (oxidized) meteorite 22.4 grams for sale!
Wabar iron (oxidized) meteorite 22.4 grams for sale!
Wabar iron (oxidized) meteorite 22.4 grams for sale!
Wabar iron (oxidized) meteorite 22.4 grams for sale!

Wabar iron (oxidized) meteorite 22.4 grams for sale!

Regular price
$ 900.00
Regular price
Sale price
$ 900.00
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per 
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A fantastic and very rare Wabar oxidized iron meteorite fragment (close to shale). Some iron fragments from the impact have a "popped" appearance. This is due to the high temperatures and pressures at impact (based on a conversation with a meteorite crater impact specialist), which caused the iron to oxidize or 'weather' (if you will) rapidly, giving the piece an appearance it has been on Earth far longer than than it has been. 

From the paper "The Wabar Meteorite Impact Site, Ar-Rub' Al-Khali Desert, Saudi Arabia" by Jeff Wynn and (the great) Gene Shoemaker.  

  1. Rare, iron-nickel fragments of the original bolide. Generally these are small and usually highly oxidized when buried in the top 40 centimeters of sand; these samples are a type IIIa medium octahedrite. These were spalled off of the incoming bolide at initial contact with the sand as the reversed shock-wave reached the back of the object. When these fragments are found on the surface, they are covered by a black patina and are almost indistinguishable from the glass.

This individual is clearly iron and has a strong attraction to a magnet.

It measures 32 x 28 x 24 mm and weighs 22.4 grams

This piece will be shipped registered mail (domestically). I will ship overseas, please contact me for shipping quotes. Thanks!

Please see the other exciting Wabar impactite products!

Wabar material from the famed meteorite impact in the Empty Quarter (Rub' al Khali) in southern Saudi Arabia. Three craters have been documented though very little material has come out of this site, and now the craters are covered over by the ever-shifting sand dunes. These pieces came from a collection that has been in storage for about 20 years; an American working in Saudi Arabia for 30 years visited the craters 3 times in the 1990s, bringing back some material. This is what remains of his collection.

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